Self Induced Stress

StressI’m pretty good at stressing myself out. Not for any particular reason; normally just because I find it’s more productive than watching TV. How, you ask?

Well, starting podcasts could be one. While they are exciting at the beginning, there is invariably some work that needs to be done. I’ll want to figure out how to get the recording setup to work or make the website more reliable or try and find some kind of funding for it. In the end, it’s driven by my desire to put my voice on the internet, but at the base of it all, there’s no reason I need to be doing this stuff.

Which brings me to my most current project. Learning about CNC machines and later purchasing one was driven from my interest in 3D printers. Yup, those shiny new machines that now seem like a walk in the park (they’re not). My interest in trying out materials outside the 3D printed space, cost vs accuracy calculations and a variety of other factors pushed me towards a CNC milling machine. Subtractive instead of additive. Metal instead of plastic. But the end result was the same as podcasting: I stressed myself out.

This isn’t a new phenomenon by any stretch. Really any kind of hobby is based upon similar principles. There’s no reason anyone needs to build model trains or crochet funny little figurines or do artwork of Star Wars characters. Some end up on Etsy or other marketplaces that pop up, but that’s hardly ever where those people start from. No, they start from being interested in the subject matter, getting into it and stressing themselves out. In a good way.

You see, when I’m talking about stress, I’m actually talking about the good kind of stress. The kind that just kind of tickles your brain and makes you want to scream and/or stay up all night figuring something out. Hell, I’m writing this post right now to try and distract my brain from thinking it needs to do just that. But this kind of stress is the basis of learning. It’s necessary. It’s healthy. And sometimes it sucks. The best I think I can do is to recognize the feeling, accept it and realize that there will be a treasure trove of knowledge on the other side of my struggle.

Back to work.

 

Thanks to slworking2 for the picture of stress

4 Comments

  1. I love The Amp Hour, you guys rock! I recently took the plunge( har) into CNC, myself: http://bytecruft.blogspot.com/search/label/CNC. There’s something a little exciting about testing code or circuit changes with your hand hovering over the emergency stop button. I’ve been dabbling in self-induced stress for years though.

  2. Sure good stress is…good, but it’s still stress! I’d much rather have the desire to learn rather than feel like I need to. When I feel like I need to do something versus desiring to do it, the amount of effort I put in over time is much less because I am still less relaxed even if I have a desire and need at the same time. It’s all about approach but Pedantite has a point about the excitement factor too! Good read!

  3. I like the sentence:
    “realize that there will be a treasure trove of knowledge on the other side of my struggle”

  4. Hi,

    I like the sentence “I’m actually talking about the good kind of stress”, but according to me stress cant be good if it extend the time limit of “THINKING”, If anyone suffering from long-term stress, your body will eventually wear itself down. But sometimes, small amounts of stress can actually be good. Understand your stress level is important, if in limited time giving good results then go for it :)

    Thanks,
    Ravenmarx

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